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Regional Systematic Map to guide decision-making

Regional Systematic Map to guide decision-making on the current landscape of research on World Health Assembly indicators in West Africa The West Africa Region has been one of the slowest in reducing its many burdens of malnutrition. The World Health Assembly’s (WHA) 2025 nutrition targets were developed to track countries’ nutritional situations, and measure progress…

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Senegal systematic map to guide decision making

Senegal Systematic Map to guide decision-making on the current landscape of research on World Health Assembly indicators in West Africa The West Africa Region has been one of the slowest in reducing its many burdens of malnutrition. The World Health Assembly’s (WHA) 2025 nutrition targets were developed to track countries’ nutritional situations, and measure progress…

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Ghana systematic map to guide decision making

Ghana Systematic Map to guide decision-making on the current landscape of research on World Health Assembly indicators in West Africa The West Africa Region has been one of the slowest in reducing its many burdens of malnutrition. The World Health Assembly’s (WHA) 2025 nutrition targets were developed to track countries’ nutritional situations, and measure progress…

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Nigeria Systematic Map to guide decision making

Nigeria Systematic Map to guide decision-making on the current landscape of research on World Health Assembly indicators in West Africa. The West Africa Region has been one of the slowest in reducing its many burdens of malnutrition. The World Health Assembly’s (WHA) 2025 nutrition targets were developed to track countries’ nutritional situations, and measure progress…

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Burkina Faso Systematic Map to guide decision making

Burkina Faso Systematic Map to guide decision-making on the current landscape of research on World Health Assembly indicators in West Africa. The West Africa Region has been one of the slowest in reducing its many burdens of malnutrition. The World Health Assembly’s (WHA) 2025 nutrition targets were developed to track countries’ nutritional situations, and measure…

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Unpacking the complexity of improved nutrition in Ghana

Two new research initiatives have commenced in Ghana. These are ‘Stories of Change in Nutrition in Ghana’, and ‘Leveraging Food Systems for Improved Nutrition in Ghana’. Both have been initiated by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). This report provides a summary of a consultative stakeholder meeting held jointly by the two initiatives on…

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Mobile phones, nutrition, and agriculture in Ghana: Cost-Effectiveness Baseline Report

Background: This is the baseline report for the cost-effectiveness analysis of the Vodafone Farmers Club, Ghana, a ValueAdded Service supported by a grant from GSMA as a part of the mNutrition programme. mNutrition is a global initiative supported by DFID, organised by GSMA, and implemented by in-country mobile network operators (MNOs) to use mobile technology to improve the health and nutritional status of children and adults in low-income countries around the world.

Method: Undertook a literature review of the cost-effectiveness of agricultural and nutrition interventions. This allows for:

enabling the cost-effectiveness to be compared with programmes that have some similar elements to the Vodafone Farmer’s Club.
Create a framework for the analysis in 2019 (from the literature and baseline data)
Collect and collate known costs at this point in time, with the specific view of gathering and monitoring missing costs in the coming period.
Analysis: Defined in three components: including setup and ongoing costs for the specific intervention (Vodafone Farmers Club) (analysis A), wider mNutrition programmatic costs (analysis B), and a scenario that included societal costs including farmer costs and benefits (analysis C).

The report is one of four baseline deliverables on the Vodafone Farmer’s Club project, each of which will be followed up by a final report at the end of the evaluation exercise in 2019.

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Assessment of Dietary Habits and Nutritional Status of Adolescents in a Resource – Poor Environment in Nigeria

Information is scarce about dietary habits and nutritional status in adolescents in Ekpoma, Nigeria. This is partly because of this age group’s reputation for capriciousness and also because health services/research in developing countries tend to focus more on pre-school children and pregnant women. This study aimed to optimize the health needs of Nigerian adolescents by determining the dietary habits and the nutritional status of adolescents using anthropometry. The cross-sectional descriptive study engaged 400 adolescents aged 10 – 19 years in four secondary schools in Ekpoma using a semi-structured questionnaire for data collection. Height (m2 ) and weight (kg) were measured and body mass index (BMI) was computed to assess underweight, normal weight, over-weight or obesity. SPSS was used to analyse data. Important factors affecting dietary habits include parental influence (87%), taste of food (71%), mass media reports (61%) and culture (55%). Percentages of underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese adolescents were 24%, 72%, 3% and 1%, respectively. There was significant association between BMI and monthly household income, p

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Effectiveness of SMS Technology on Timely Community Health Worker Follow-Up for Childhood Malnutrition: A Retrospective Cohort Study in sub-Saharan Africa

Background: The Millennium Villages Project facilitated technology-based health interventions in rural under-resourced areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Our study examined whether data entry using SMS compared with paper forms by community health workers (CHWs) led to higher proportion of timely follow-up visits for malnutrition screening in under-5 children in Ghana, Rwanda, Senegal, and Uganda.

Methods : Children under 5 years were screened for malnutrition every 90 days by CHWs using mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) readings. CHWs used either SMS texts or paper forms to enter MUAC data. Reminder texts were sent at 15 days before follow-up was needed. Chi-square tests assessed proportion of timely follow-up visits within 90 days between SMS and paper groups. Logistic regression analysis was conducted in a step-wise multivariate model. Post-hoc power calculations were conducted to verify strength of associations.

Results: SMS data entry was associated with a higher proportion of timely malnutrition follow-up visits compared with paper forms across all sites. The association was strongest with consistent SMS use over consecutive visits. SMS use at the first of 2 consecutive visits was most effective, highlighting the importance of SMS reminder alerts.

Conclusions: SMS technology with reminders increased timely CHW malnutrition screening visits for under-5 children in Ghana, Rwanda, Senegal, and Uganda, highlighting the importance of such technology for improving health worker behavior in low-resource settings

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Global implications of the new WHO and UNICEF implementation guidance on the revised Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative

Although breastfeeding confers both short‐ and long‐term benefits for children and their mothers, breastfeeding practice remains suboptimal, globally. In addition to barriers including misperceptions and inappropriate marketing of breast milk substitutes, inadequate support for breastfeeding remains a challenge in many settings. To improve access to appropriate health system support, the World Health Organization(WHO) has reviewed the Baby‐Friendly Hospital Initiative(BFHI), which ensures provision of optimal clinical care and support to mothers and their infants. This review has resulted in revision of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, which form the core standards of (BFHI).

These now consist of critical management procedures to support breastfeeding (Steps 1and 2) and key clinical practices to support breastfeeding (Steps 3‐10). In Step 1, there is now specific emphasis on compliance with the WHO Code of Marketing of Breast‐milk Substitutes and relevant World Health Assembly resolutions as well as on internal monitoring. There are also significant position shifts like the recommendation to “Counsel mothers on the use and risks of feeding bottles, teats, and pacifiers,” which is a departure from the earlier position of avoiding reference to these technologies. These revisions require countries and states to revise activities and tools for their local situation but without compromising the standard.